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Michael Lukin
Michael Lukin

I Need A Loan To Buy A Car


Instead of getting a loan for the full cost of the car, you get a loan for the difference between its price brand new and the predicted value of the car at the end of the hire agreement. This is based on a forecast of annual mileage over the term of the agreement.




i need a loan to buy a car



If you plan to take your car abroad, check your PCP contract as some companies will impose a limit on the number of days your car can be out of the country and you might need to request permission before taking it abroad.


But many Americans make big mistakes buying cars. Take new car purchases with a trade-in. A third of buyers roll over an average of $5,000 in debt from their last car into their new loan. They're paying for a car they don't drive anymore. Ouch! That is not a winning personal finance strategy.


"The single best advice I can give to people is to get preapproved for a car loan from your bank, a credit union or an online lender," says Philip Reed. He's the autos editor at the personal finance site NerdWallet. He also worked undercover at an auto dealership to learn the secrets of the business when he worked for the car-buying site Edmunds.com. So Reed is going to pull back the curtain on the car-buying game.


For one thing, he says, getting a loan from a lender outside the car dealership prompts buyers to think about a crucial question. "How much car can I afford? You want to do that before a salesperson has you falling in love with the limited model with the sunroof and leather seats. "


So Reed says having that preapproval can be a valuable card to have in your hand in the car-buying game. It can help you negotiate a better rate. "The preapproval will act as a bargaining chip," he says. "If you're preapproved at 4.5%, the dealer says, 'Hey, you know, I can get you 3.5. Would you be interested?' And it's a good idea to take it, but make sure all of the terms, meaning the down payment and the length of the loan, remain the same."


So at the dealership, Reed and Van Alst both say, the first step is to start with the price of the vehicle you are buying. The salesperson at the dealership will often want to know if you're planning to trade in another car and whether you're also looking to get a loan through the dealership. Reed says don't answer those questions! That makes the game too complicated, and you're playing against pros. If you negotiate a really good purchase price on the car, they might jack up the interest rate to make extra money on you that way or lowball you on your trade-in. They can juggle all those factors in their head at once. You don't want to. Keep it simple. One thing at a time.


"Concerning the extended factory warranty, you can always buy it later," says Reed. "So if you're buying a new car, you can buy it in three years from now, just before it goes out of warranty." At that point, if you want the extended warranty, he says, you should call several dealerships and ask for the best price each can offer. That way, he says, you're not rolling the cost into your car loan and paying interest on a service you wouldn't even use for three years because you're still covered by the new car's warranty.


A third of new car loans are now longer than six years. And that's "a really dangerous trend," says Reed. We have a whole story about why that's the case. But in short, a seven-year loan will mean lower monthly payments than a five-year loan. But it will also mean paying a lot more money in interest.


Reed says a colleague at NerdWallet actually bought a minivan recently and "when she got home, she looked at the contract." She had asked for a five-year loan but said the dealership instead stuck her with a seven-year loan. "And they included a factory warranty which she didn't request and she didn't want." Reed says she was able to cancel the entire contract, remove the extended warranty and get a rebate on it.


"The single best advice I can give to people is to get preapproved for a car loan from your bank, a credit union or an online lender," says Philip Reed. He's an automotive expert who writes a column for the personal finance site NerdWallet. He also worked undercover at an auto dealership to learn the secrets of the business when he worked for the car-buying site Edmunds.com. So Reed is going to pull back the curtain on the car-buying game.


For one thing, he says, getting a loan from a lender outside the car dealership prompts buyers to think about a crucial question: "How much car can I afford? You want to do that before a salesperson has you falling in love with the limited model with the sunroof and leather seats."


"The preapproval will act as a bargaining chip," he says. "If you're preapproved at 4.5%, the dealer says, 'Hey, you know, I can get you 3.5. Would you be interested?' And it's a good idea to take it, but make sure all of the terms and conditions, meaning the down payment and the length of the loan, remain the same."


These days many of us like to research things we buy online. And that's good. But you also need to get your hands off the laptop or smartphone and onto some steering wheels or you'll waste a lot of time researching vehicles that you won't like in the end.


Whitmire says you need to be a bit more old school about things and actually drive a bunch of cars. "I've been doing this for 40 years," she says. "It used to be that people would go to a dealership and drive around and figure out what car they actually wanted, what their choices were."


The salesperson at the dealership will often want to know if you're planning to trade in another car and whether you're also looking to get a loan through the dealership. Reed says don't answer those questions! That makes the game too complicated, and you're playing against pros.


A third of new car loans are now longer than six years. And that's "a really dangerous trend," says Reed. We have a whole story about why that's the case. In short, a seven-year loan will mean lower monthly payments than a five-year loan. But it will also mean paying a lot more money in interest.


As with other types of loans, you pay a lot more interest than principal in the early years, so you're paying off what you actually owe much more slowly in a seven-year loan. "There's so much interest front-loaded in that," says Whitmire.


Seven-year car loans are financially dangerous because cars depreciate in value the moment you drive off the lot. "You're waging this battle against depreciation because basically you're paying off a loan while the car drops in value," says Reed.


One big risk is that you might need to sell the car well before seven years. You might lose your job, or you have a kid, or a third kid and need a minivan. When you go to sell that car on a seven-year loan, you're likely going to find out that you owe thousands of dollars more than the car is actually worth.


A lot of people could apparently use this advice. According to industry data, 32% of new car buyers with a trade-in are rolling over about $5,000 in negative equity into their next loan when they buy a new car.


If you need finance to buy a car, a personal loan or bank loan from a bank or building society can be one of the cheapest ways of borrowing the money if you can get a good rate. But remember to look into the pros and cons of personal loans first.


You can also ask for a partial loan settlement. This will make your loan smaller, and so will affect how you pay for the rest of your loan. The rebate you receive for any interest and charges will be less than if you pay off the whole loan.


Most buyers in most situations will likely find it more economical to apply for an auto loan from either a bank or the car dealer. These loans are generally less expensive and easier to get. There are exceptions, however, and times when it makes more financial sense to opt for a personal loan to pay for your vehicle.


Personal loans are usually unsecured and do not have to be used for any specific purpose; you use the funds at your discretion. They typically range from $1,000 to $50,000, and, like auto loans, they are paid off in fixed amounts each month.


Personal loans are made by banks or other lending institutions and have flexible repayment periods that can range from 12 to 36 months or more. The longer the loan, the less you will have to pay each month, but you will end up paying more in interest over the life of the loan.


So why would anyone bother to apply for a personal loan to buy a car, when they can get an auto loan more easily and for less money? Here are a few instances when using a personal loan to purchase a vehicle could work in your favor:


Demand for used cars is high and supply is limited. With fewer options available and the average used car priced at $24,815, buying a used car from a private party may help you get the vehicle you want for less. But what if you don't have enough cash to pay the seller? Fortunately, you can get a loan to buy a car from a private party. Here are some options to consider.


Unlike a dealership, however, a private seller won't have a finance department on hand to offer you a loan. Since a private seller must get paid in full before you take possession of the car, you'll need to do some legwork on your own to find financing.What Are Your Options for Private Party Financing?The most common ways to finance a private party auto purchase are by using a personal loan or a private party auto loan. Both types of loans are available from banks, credit unions, online lenders and other financial institutions. Which is the most cost-effective option?


A private party auto loan uses the car itself as collateral to secure the loan, so the lender can repossess the car if you don't pay. As a result, private party auto loans generally have lower interest rates than personal loans and may be easier to get if your credit is less than stellar. 041b061a72


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